Thursday, October 13, 2016

BIbliovile: Get in a Tiff

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Never Trust a Liberal Over 3—Especially a Republican! by Ann Coulter
What's with the different fonts? Is it written on
that hanging board or not?


Ann Coulter is the most hateful person in the world. I don't want to talk about it any more than that.

The end.

Blood and Silver, by James R. Tuck

              In Blood and Silver, an occult bounty hunter named Deacon Chalk saves a pregnant weredog who is being beaten by a group of evil lycanthropes. A second group of lycanthropes tries to take the weredog, whose name is Sophia. Deacon kills one of them. A third group of lycanthropes asks Deacon to protect a member of the second group of lycanthropes from the first group of lycanthropes. Deacon and the third group go to rescue Marcus, the leader of the second group, from the first group, which is led by Marcus’ brother, Leonidas, who is, unsurprisingly, a lion. Some people die, and lots more get hurt, but Deacon heals them with his supernatural powers that he has because he was killed once, but he was resurrected after getting a blood transfusion from an Angel of the Lord.
              Deacon has sex with a girl named Tiff. We learn that Marcus is the one that got Sophia pregnant. A family named the Coopers is killed. Shani, Marcus’s mate, is the one who told Leonidas to go after Sophia. There is a battle scene, in which a man shifts into a T-Rex. He is killed within one chapter and never discussed again. More people die. Deacon kills Marcus and Leonidas. We think Deacon kills Shani, but we learn at the end that he only tranquilized her, and then gave her to the local zoo. That’s the plot.

              There are parts of this book that pleasantly surprised me. For example, in chapter 21, there is a sex scene between Deacon and Tiff, but instead of being grossly graphic, like I was expecting, the entire scene is written entirely in metaphors, without a single explicit word in the chapter. It’s not poetic or well-written by any means, but I appreciate the restraint used by not making the sex scene gratuitous and gross. I expected a book like this to go into Choosers of the Slain levels of pervertedness, but James Tuck kept this one classy.
              The writing in other portions of the book is also surprisingly good. In chapter 25, Deacon is sent to go check on a family that no one has heard from in awhile, and he finds them all dead in their home. If you set aside the fact that we have never heard of these characters before, we never find out who killed them, and they’re never brought up again, the writing in this chapter is actually very good. Tuck does a great job of building suspense. You know that Deacon’s going to find the bodies of the family, but the author keeps you on the edge of your seat until it actually happens. Pretty impressive work for a TBE book.
              Another thing that I really appreciate about this book is that shifting is actually explained in sufficient detail for once. Most people in society don’t know that shifters exist, but a few do, and they work to make sure that the rest of society doesn’t find out. Shifters are typically born, but lycanthropy can also be caught like a disease. There’s enough detail that I actually feel like I know what the hell is going on, and I’m not left puzzled, like I was in, I don’t know, EVERY OTHER SHIFTING BOOK EVER.
True to TBE form, however, the author likes to go on random tangents at weird times. Throughout the majority of the book, the tangents are just explanations of things that happened in the first book, dropped right in the middle of an action sequence (like literally every other book I’ve read for this project). There is one glorious example of this in p. 182 that doesn’t involve a battle scene, though. Deacon and his posse are all sitting down to discuss a battle plan, and he waxes poetic for three-quarters of a page about veggie pizza. It’s amazing.

              All in all, this was a solid Terrible Book Exchange book. I never wanted to throw it across the room, I read it in three days, and it was just ridiculous enough to make me yell, “WHAT IS EVEN HAPPENING,” at least twice while reading it. 

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